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Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.
I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 
Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:
“It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 
It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.
It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 
But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”
There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 
Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.
I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 
Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:
“It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 
It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.
It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 
But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”
There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 
Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.
I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 
Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:
“It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 
It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.
It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 
But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”
There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 

Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.

I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 

Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:

It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 

It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.

It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 

But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”

There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 


Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!
Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).
Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!
All pics available here in high resolution.

Oh my friends, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown! Oh my friends and fellow-countrymen, the slaves of an ironhanded and a grinding despotism! Oh my friends and fellow-sufferers, and fellow-workmen, and fellow-men! I tell you that the hour is come, when we must rally round one another as One united power, and crumble into dust the oppressors that too long have battened upon the plunder of our families, upon the sweat of our brows, upon the labour of our hands, upon the strength of our sinews, upon the God-created glorious rights of Humanity, and upon the holy and eternal privileges of Brotherhood!

Hard Times, Charles Dickens (1854)

The work of the American photographer Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) has always looked so Dickensian to me. Half a century later, things across the Atlantic weren’t very different to Dickens’ novels. Yet, it’s even more scary (and shameful) the fact that today child labour is still a reality in some countries (not to mention the social conditions).

Btw, there’s an exhibition in Madrid that I’m very excited about devoted to Lewis Hine. Go if you have a chance!

All pics available here in high resolution.

La Cinématèque Française has organized an exhibition around Metropolis, one of my favourite films ever. It seems like all the secrets from the shooting are unveiled; and you may find a real-size reproduction of the robot (pretty cool, righ?), apart from the settings, photographies, drafts and lots of stuff.  Don’t miss the chance if you’re in Paris! It’s open until January 29th.


And in case you haven’t watched it yet… what are you waiting for?! 

"Palm Oil" by Rodrigue Mbok.

The 9th edition of Rencontres de Bamako (Bamako Encounters), the Biennial of African Photography, is running from 1st Nov till 1st January in a series of exhibitions all over the world. Casa África, in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, will held some exhibits. Don’t miss them if you’re around! If you’re not among the lucky ones, go and check some photographies here.

(Photo via lalettredelaphotographie)

Of philias and manias

"The Automat", by Edward Hopper.

The Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid is holding an exhibition of one of my favourite painters, Edward Hopper, next year. Since I missed the “Made in USA” exhibition, where some of his paintings were exposed, I’m really looking forward to it. 

 (via Capnomancia frenopática: Edward Hopper)

The Gleaming Lights of the Souls, by Yayoi Kusama.

As I promised, here you have some more Kusama’s stuff. This artwork is pretty similar to the instalation you can see at Reina Sofía’s Museum in Madrid, defo my favorite part of the exhibition. In case you have not the chance to go, click the link to see an interactive picture to get the feeling: http://www.mediavr.com/infinityroom2.htm. It’s just mirrors and LEDs, but it’s really amazing when you’re there. Simplicity is genius, right?

So, how do you like Yayoi Kusama?

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