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Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.
I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 
Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:
“It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 
It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.
It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 
But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”
There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 
Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.
I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 
Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:
“It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 
It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.
It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 
But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”
There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 
Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.
I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 
Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:
“It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 
It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.
It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 
But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”
There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 

Gervasio Sánchez: compromised journalism, anti personnel mines and Bosnian War.

I’ve been too busy to update my tumblr lately, but I can’t help posting some Gervasio Sánchez's photographs. This Spanish photojournalist has covered many international conflicts, from the Bosnian War (whose infamous 20th anniversary has been remembered this week) to Sierra Leona, Chile or Iraq. He’s a fully compromised journalist who has reported not only the dictatorial regimes and the horrors of war, but also the acquiescence and passivity of the so-called “first world” governments. 

Yesterday it was the International Day Against Anti Personnel Mines. Let’s remember his speech at the Ortega y Gasset photography Awards in Spain, denouncing the selling of anti personnel bombs by the Spanish government:

It’s true that the weapons found on the battlefields tend to be manufactured in developed countries such as our own, which was a huge exporter of mines in the past and that today does very little to help the victims of mines and the mine removal effort. 

It’s true that all the Spanish politicians, since the beginning of the transition, headed by presidents Adolfo Suárez, Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo, Felipe González, José María Aznar and José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, permitted and continue to permit the sale of Spanish arms to countries with internal conflicts or open wars.

It’s true that I’m shocked every time that I run into Spanish weapons in the forgotten battlefields of the third world, and I’m ashamed of my political representatives. 

But like Martin Luther King Jr., I refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt, and also like him, I have a dream: that a Spanish president will finally have enough guts to put an end to the silent arms market that, whether we like it or not, is turning our country into an exporter of death.”

There’s an anthological exhibition of Gervasio Sánchez’s work at the Tabacalera centre in Madrid that I highly recommend you. 

No es este el relato de hazañas impresionantes. Es un trozo de dos vidas tomadas en un momento en el que cursaron juntas un determinado trecho, con identidad de aspiraciones y conjunción de sueños.

¿Fue nuestra visión demasiado estrecha, demasiado parcial, demasiado apresurada? ¿Fueron nuestras conclusiones demasiado rígidas? Tal vez. Pero ese vagar sin rumbo por nuestra mayúscula América me ha cambiado más de lo que creí. Yo ya no soy yo. Por lo menos no soy el mismo yo interior.

Ernesto “Che” Guevara de la Serna, 1951-1952.
Final clip and dialogue from the film The Motorcycle Diaries, by Walter Salles (2004), based on Guevara’s book.

Song: “De Ushuaia a la Quiaca”, by Gustavo Santaolalla. 

In English: “This is not the tale of impressive deeds. It is a piece of two lives taken in a moment when they were cruising together along a given path with the same identity, aspirations and dreams. Was our vision too narrow, too partial, too rushed? Were our conclusions too rigid? Maybe. But that aimless roaming through our enormous America changed me more than I thought. I am not myself anymore. At least, I’m not the same inside.”

We still have reasons to be angry (and maybe even more)
In the picture, protesters and press crowd the Plaza del Sol, in Madrid, during the October 15 demonstration.
We are still indignados and ready to wave our protest banners. 
Photography by Juan del Pozo. 
Zoom Info
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
ISO
800
Aperture
f/3.7
Exposure
1/20th
Focal Length
44mm

We still have reasons to be angry (and maybe even more)

In the picture, protesters and press crowd the Plaza del Sol, in Madrid, during the October 15 demonstration.

We are still indignados and ready to wave our protest banners. 

Photography by Juan del Pozo

Somalia is still hungry, please remember

Safia Adem, a refugee in Mogadiscio, mourns the death of her child.

This photography, taken by John Moore in August 12, 2011, shows the face of only one the hundreds of thousands who are struggling to survive in the Horn of Africa, many in the overcrowded camp of Dabaad

Many starve, a few benefit, and to forget is unforgivable. 

The real damage is done by those millions who want to ‘survive.’ The honest men who just want to be left in peace. Those who don’t want their little lives disturbed by anything bigger than themselves. Those with no sides and no causes. Those who won’t take measure of their own strength, for fear of antagonizing their own weakness. Those who don’t like to make waves—or enemies. Those for whom freedom, honour, truth, and principles are only literature. Those who live small, mate small, die small. It’s the reductionist approach to life: if you keep it small, you’ll keep it under control. If you don’t make any noise, the bogeyman won’t find you. But it’s all an illusion, because they die too, those people who roll up their spirits into tiny little balls so as to be safe. Safe?! From what? Life is always on the edge of death; narrow streets lead to the same place as wide avenues, and a little candle burns itself out just like a flaming torch does. I choose my own way to burn.

Sophie Scholl (1921-1943). Member of the anti-nazi group Die Weisse Rose (The White Rose). 

Sophie Scholl

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